Green Book (2018) Poster

(2018)

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8/10
Are We There Yet?
martindonovanitaly26 December 2018
A journey of reawakening in a Country like ours - Gore Vidal called it the United States Of Amnesia - the absurdity of the behavior in the Southern communities even the kindest ones have a jarring effect. Viggo Mortensen is sheer perfection as the all American Italian. The opening of his heart and of his mind is a total joy and Mahershala Ali provides another magnetic character to his already rich list of magnetic characters but what makes this film fly so high is the humanity that Mortensen and Ali infuse their characters with. I loved them and Green Book provided me with one of the most satisfying endings of 2018. It leaves you with the hopeful thought that perhaps we're not there yet but that we are on our way. Happy New Year!
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10/10
"Green Book" is Gold
taylor_king-890-81549125 November 2018
We loved Green Book along with the sold-out crowd who applauded loudly at the end. Based on true story of piano virtuoso, Don Shirley's road trip through the south during the 60's, the film pays tribute to his genius and courage as a black man who tries hard to soar above the ugliness of the times. The elegant trappings of his home and his success as a concert pianist leave him arrogantly cold and lonely, but his life begins to change when he hires Tony as his road trip driver. With a history as nightclub bouncer with Mafia connections in New York, Tony is the antithesis of Don's perfection and their evolving relationship on the road makes the movie soar above the ordinary and become magical. Viggo and Ali in the main roles are remarkable, and it's funny and endearing to watch them discard stereotypes and discover their mutual humanity. What we liked best is the movie teaches without preaching, it all unfolds through a myriad of natural moments between two great actors and a strong supporting cast. Top all this off with a really good soundtrack, excellent direction and production values, and an audience that laughed out loud and vigorously applauded at the end...this one is a true 10!
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9/10
Greatful to have seen this
Lotus-318 September 2018
I saw this at the premier at TIFF and was thrilled to learn the story is about a real friendship. This is not a typical road movie, or buddy film. Given the lead actors, I knew it would be something special, and it is. Entertaining, funny in parts, hard to accept in others - as a white american who wasn't around in the 1960's, the racism was mind boggling and I couldn't help but feel shame. Green Book has so many layers - family, culture, honesty, dignity, genius, respect, acceptance, stereotypes, racism, music, class, friendship, and fried chicken. Whatever your views, race, or age - this film is not 'preachy', but you should appreciate an honest portrayal of a difficult time & place in history. I'll use the term an "unlikely friendship", but knowing the two men were real makes it fantastic. I'm so grateful to have learned about them and their lives. I only wish there had been a Q&A afterward.
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9/10
Critic-proof festival hit should be big holiday winner
Art Snob22 September 2018
Some of my movie friends were stunned when I mentioned in a thread that this was my "People's Choice Award" vote for TIFF 2018 (it won, btw). I generally go for weightier fare, so my being won over by a PG-13 road film with the familiar "they-couldn't-have-been-more-different" premise directed by the auteur co-responsible for such recent classics as "Dumb and Dumber To" and "The Three Stooges" elicited a virtual double-take.

But I couldn't help it ... it really WAS the best film I saw (out of 17), and far and away the most entertaining. I think this is largely because it's based on a real-life story about the beginning of a lifelong friendship - a story that has writing participation by the son of one of the real-life characters. There's definitely an air of authenticity to the events as they unfold that could never occur with a purely contrived plot. Consider: A college-educated concert pianist of Jamaican descent hires a temporarily-unemployed Italian-American nightclub bouncer who's streetwise but academically dim to drive him to venues in the Deep South back in 1962. That's not a setup that a Hollywood script written from scratch would ever have come up with.

The two lead actors really click. Mahershala Ali makes a nice Oscar follow-up playing the aloof pianist passenger to Viggo Mortensen's "b.s. artist" driver. Ali is certain to get another nomination; Mortensen's performance may be a little too broad to garner one, but he delivers exactly what's called for. And he makes a believable Italian-American, which is impressive considering that he's Danish.

I'm allergic to preaching and heavy-handedness in movies no matter what the message, and with the exception of one borderline scene, I'd say that the movie nicely sidesteps these proclivities that surface so often in socially-conscious films.

The music and FX are excellent. When an actor plays a piano player, there's always the challenge of making the playing look believable. It doesn't get any better than it gets here - Ali's piano playing is every bit as convincing as Margot Robbie's ice skating in I, TONYA. You never see a disconnect between hands and body as he's filmed against a variety of backgrounds. And if I could bet on an Oscar win right now, it would be Kris Bowers for Best Original Score. (He also supplies Ali's hands, which should clinch it.)

Top everything off with a Capra-esque Christmas Eve finale and a closing line that sends everyone home smiling, and it all adds up to a monster hit. Its commercial payoff could be huge - the movie practically begs for a TV series spinoff, and the real-life characters remained friends until they both died in 2013.

So congratulations to Peter Farrelly on his graduation from co-directing lowbrow fare to solo-directing middlebrow (i.e. mass-appeal) fare. You can't deny the talent and craftsmanship it takes to make a mainstream movie that works as well as this one does.
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10/10
Simply wonderful in its portrayal of humanity
ColoDrz26 December 2018
Green Book is a wonderful story of overcoming self-condemnation, and the resulting freedom it provides. As the film begins, Tony is locked in a prison of judgment and rejection, not from any conscious effort on his own but rather his circumstances and environment. As the self-assured and self-aware character of Dr. Shirley is introduced into Tony's life, Tony embarks on a journey of self-discovery in which he is forced to confront his own preconceived notions which ultimately stem from his skewed view of himself. As Dr. Shirley helps Tony to see himself as a man beyond his own limiting thoughts, Tony is finally able to step into his true nature as friend to Dr. Shirley. Everywhere in this film we are reminded that people are complicated, but beyond these complications we are also reminded that everyone is the same, just looking for love and acceptance. The scene where Dolores reads Tony's letter to her cousins is spectacular in this regard. It's interesting that none of the other reviews mention the YMCA scene and aftermath, which for me was the pinnacle moment that the power shifted for these two characters confronting their own strengths and weaknesses. This film is simply wonderful in its portrayal of humanity, and the people we need in our lives. While it comes to light that Tony's wife Dolores is completely aware of her husband's imperfections and shortcomings, she loves him just the same. But it is confrontation, not love, that is necessary to bring about Tony's redemption, demonstrating that the people who spur us to deep, personal growth are never who or what we expect.
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10/10
GO SEE THIS FILM!
chloedevoy21 September 2018
I saw this at TIFF and loved it from beginning to end. It's a moving true story about two people who forge an unlikely friendship. Thought-provoking but never preachy.
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10/10
Finally...Well-written, well-acted Movie
rphshell26 November 2018
This picture should be up for BEST PICTURE. It has everything: great acting, solid script-writing (something that Hollywood really needs), and lots of humor. I wish that Hollywood would make more pictures like this.
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10/10
Best example of the power of cinema
mhope-9160124 November 2018
Who could've ever greenlit "Green Book"? A (mostly) true story of two men of completely different backgrounds overcoming their own prejudices and the stifling racism of the Deep South of the early 1960s. We'll hire a Danish guy to play an Italian guy, and a guy best known for playing a political fixer and a dope dealer (in "House of Cards" and "Moonlight", respectively) to play a Jamaican-American musical genius. And we'll have one of the Farrelly brothers direct it. How could that possibly become a great movie? Well, it does- primarily through the great performances of Viggo Jorgensen and Mahershala Ali, and the nuanced directing of Peter Farrelly. It confronts the racism prevalent at the time without becoming preachy, and shows its main characters growing through contact with each other, without a complete reversal of their characters (which would've seemed phony). Oh, and the movie looks great, too- the period cars, sets, and costumes really take you back to that time period. A film festival favorite, "Green Book" will hopefully be appreciated by Oscar voters, too.
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10/10
Oscar Noms for both leads and director/screenwriters in order here!
djrathbun31 October 2018
I saw this film in a preview here in Calgary.

I've seen Mortensen in films before and thought he was an okay film actor. His embodiment of Tony Lip is totally immersive. I not only believe his Bronx character, but depiction of Tony's growth as a human being is remarkable to watch. I can't say enough about Ali's performance as Don Shirley. It is nuanced and impressive.

Watching these two characters interact and change each other is fascinating. This isn't just another road-trip buddy movie. It is funny, it is poignant and it is a brilliantly written and crafted film.

The only drawback is, you will have to wait until US Thanksgiving to see it.
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10/10
A real audience pleaser
jfadler21 October 2018
This movie has it all......it's a true story done just right. The audience clapped and clapped when the movie ended and no one got up until the last credit rolled. It's hard to believe that this was 1962 and even more frightening to think that some of the behaviors in the movie are being duplicated today in this country. It's a movie that is worth seeing again and again, it's that good and realistic.
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9/10
Fantastic film, another music themed Oscar nominee
theojhyman12 October 2018
Just caught this as the surprise film of the London Film Festival. Such a well written drama with heart, soul and comedic touches, brilliantly performed by the two main actors, and given such an authentic 1962 shiny look to the film by the production designer and cinematographer. A truly great true story with themes that all audiences can connect with - namely, music, family, race, sexuality, friendship and love - and Viggo Mortensen probably gives the performance of a lifetime. Will surely rival A Star is Born at the Oscars in many of the same categories.
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10/10
True Stories For Your Soul
hiphopphotos5 December 2018
One of the reasons why I love this movie is simply because we are soooo much more. We as "Black" people have rich, intriguing, moving, and funny stories-I hate that we are sitting around waiting for the Next Great Director make movies in which the narratives do more than entertain. I hope Tyler Perry would be one of those innovative directors, but now I don't care who tells it-as long as it gets told. Thank you to the writer and director for such a moving movie that touches more than my funny bone.
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8/10
A perfect example of Yin & Yang - and black and white has nothing to do with it.
TheTopDawg2 January 2019
Outstanding true story film showing that color doesn't define us, but how we act ourselves and towards others, does.

Great performances from the entire cast, especially Viggo Mortensen and Mahershala Ali who were perfectly cast and convincing in their roles. It was also great to see comedian Sebastian Maniscalco in this film as well.

Writer, director and producer Peter Farrelly nailed every aspect of this biography.

The score, cinematography, sets and visuals were all on point.

I'm not a fan of slow paced long films, but this was was close to an exception. I feel if the pace was picked up a bit and/or the 130 min run-time edited down to around 110 mins, this would have been a perfect 10 from me.

Excellent drama and comedy perfectly positioned throughout the film.

A well deserved 8/10 from me.
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10/10
The music and cars alone...
bron-tay29 November 2018
This movie is not only smart and funny, it is incredibly watchable and enjoyable. The cars, the food, the clothes, the background music, the piano playing, the faces and voices of the character actors -- not a dull frame.

To story, writing, directing -- This movie avoided the traps that road-trip buddy movies faceplant into. Scenes that easily could have been trite and corny were fresh and sharp. No punches pulled, people ground into the dirt and resurrected by sheer strength of will. Some of the events were so painful and unsparing that I had no idea how the movie would end.

Another big thing, the movie wasn't cynical despite some of the ugliness it reveals. Faith, family, honor, are all part of the movie without being in your face. You'll fall in love with the characters.
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8/10
Green Book (2018)
rockman18218 November 2018
Well its hard to ignore that this looked like Driving Miss Daisy with the races of the characters reversed. It was also hard to ignore that Peter Farrelly along with his brother, is normally known for bringing often crude comedy films. While Green Book does have a ton of humor it was definitely a step in a different direction and a true story to adapt at that. I'm amazed at how much I liked this film. Every minute of this film is thoroughly enjoyable and it touches on every emotion.

The film is about a loud mouth Italian American named Tony Lip who gets a job driving and being protection for a jazz pianist named Don Shirley. Initially, it is seen that the two come from different worlds and are at odds with each other but as time goes on and the two realize how different race relations are in the south, they begin to bond and become closer than they expected they would. Starring Viggo Mortensen and Mahershala Ali in the title roles.

The film has a lot of laugh out loud moments. Especially through the eccentric nature of both leads. Whether its Tony's hard headed but uncultured nature or Don's particularities , the chemistry between the two is really off the charts. The film touches on many important concepts that still reverberate today, mainly in race relations and acceptance of sexuality. Farrelly and the real life son of Tony Lip do such a fine job writing a film that knows when to be funny and when to be serious.

I think the performances from both leads is also fantastic. We are about done with the year and I don't really care what other people say this should be getting nominations is a few categories at the Academy Awards. Was really surprised at how good this film was, as the trailers don't really show off the true excellence that this film was capable of. Urge everyone to go see it, about as good as a buddy road film will be.

8/10
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9/10
Won the People's choice award at TIFF, and it will win you over too!
michaeljohnson-275971 October 2018
It's frightening to think how far we came (past tense) and how far we've regressed when it comes to something like social equality. Many people would agree that Western, perhaps even Global culture has been regressing when it comes to acceptance and racial relations.

To say that Green Book, a story about racial relations and acceptance (or lack thereof) is strangely topical, is also an oversimplification. What might be more strange however, isn't the timing of the film's release, or the fact that a story taking place in early 1960's America is contemporary, is the fact that the latest cinematic voice, the newest artist to reintroduce concepts like love and acceptance (concepts Mortensen said are "lost track of a lot these days" in the Q & A session after my TIFF screening of the film) ...is Peter Farrelly. Yes, that Peter Farrelly; the one who countless times teamed up with his brother to bring us trendy comedy classics like Dumb & Dumber, Me Myself & Irene, and There's Something About Mary.

Green Book follows the story of a working class Italian-American, Tony Lip (Viggo Moretensen) who, after losing work as a bouncer, finds himself working for Dr. Don Shirley (Mahershala Ali), an African-American classical pianist on tour through the deep South of 1960's America. The two are the archetypal odd-couple, with Dr. Shirley being scholarly, fastidious and composed and Tony being what would seem to be an Italian-American cinematic stereotype; tough, loud, and brash.

While we may not associate either of the Farrelly brothers with drama, audiences lately haven't associated them with comedy either. Recent releases such as Dumb & Dumber To, The Three Stooges, Hall Pass, even as far back as Fever Pitch had neither audiences nor critics waiting for the next Farrelly project. That changed for me personally when I discovered Green Book, and discovered that not only is Peter turning to more dramatic subject matter, but that his brother isn't a part of the project at all.

"My answer was always 'when it happens'. I never planned what was going to be next, it was just a thing the universe brought you, dropped in your lap, it would be like planning when you're going to fall in love, you never know when it's going to happen" Farrelly told the audience at TIFF that he didn't actively seek out this project, it came up very organically, and that when he heard co-writer Brian Hayes Currie talk about the film, he knew it was a 'home-run' idea.

He might be right. About everything. The fact that this idea came his way and just felt, the timing, his background; this film would not be the same without Farrelly's approach. That may seem self-explanatory, but what I'm addressing is the fact that this film needed the touch of a comedic filmmaker, or at least this specific comedic filmmaker. Within he and his brothers' specific niche of comedy, there was something that was always enjoyable about it, even if the comedy itself, was not. They knew about human connection.

The Farrelly brothers always, without fail, had a shmaltzy moment of love, one way or another. Even when dealing with Lloyd and Harry in Dumb & Dumber, when dealing with caricatures of human beings, there is a bond there, there is a love. So imagine if suddenly Peter Farrelly starting taking things seriously? When a filmmaker understands sentiment and human connection, then it's not such a stretch to make the jump to drama.

Farrelly's influence on the mood of the film is fairly obvious. He's never been a subtle filmmaker, and the film does lack significant drama. After my viewing of the film I wouldn't even categorize it as a drama, because, while there may be hurdles the characters have to overcome, it seems to be a very light-hearted story. Arguably, the most lighthearted version of an extremely heavy subject matter. I was always waiting for the other shoe to drop, dramatically speaking, but nothing too heavy ever came. Every time there is something even remotely dramatic, the two characters get out of it with relative ease. There's nothing necessarily wrong with that, but some might see this as too lighthearted, and not truly dealing with the reality of racial segregation and prejudice. There's nothing necessarily wrong with that, as it's the tone of the film all three writers and Farrelly were going for, but considering the subject matter, this may actually anger audience members. The title Green Book refers to a 'travel guide' of sorts for African-Americans of that time. Realistically though, it was more of a 'survival-guide', as it informed those families where it was safe to travel, what restaurants they were permitted to eat in, and the 'colored only' locations to lodge. For many families, the Green Book has significant personal meaning.

What I am suggesting, is that is merely subtext, despite what they chose to be the title. The story is really about our shared humanity despite differences, and while these characters do reinforce some stereotypes, it shatters others. Mahershala and Mortensen create characters that are part caricature, part inspiration, but regardless of how you view them, it works. The two are so well-balanced, it's difficult to say if either of them is truly the lead. That's of the utmost importance, as this unlikely friendship is what inspired the film and drives the story.

I never feel like I am watching Mahershala Ali acting, as... to be honest... I don't really know who Mahershala Ali is. (That is a testament to his acting, not a comment on the fact he and I don't hang out in the same social circles). However, his role as Dr. Shirley is drastically different than anything I've seen him do before. His sense of who the character is, his mannerisms, his diction, even his inner thought process become clear through Ali's performance. Since this is a more comedic film in tone, I have to also compliment Ali's sense of timing. The character is reserved for the majority of the film, and being a straight man in a comedic duo is not easy, but Ali finds a brilliant balance of drama and comedy. It's another performance, that while perhaps not award worthy, he will assuredly be remembered for.

Green Book will also be remembered. The balance it finds within small sub-genres of cinema is carefully crafted; part road-trip buddy movie, part period piece, part social commentary, but all enjoyable. It may not spark serious conversation between audience members. It certainly won't solve the social inequality and hatred that plagues many parts of the world still to this day. It does, however, serve as a reminder of the core concepts it successfully portrays. Mortensen when addressing the crowd put it best: "There's something very profound there that we lose track of. These days, we lose track of it a lot. And that is anybody has the right to understand or appreciate other people... you can respect each other ...you can listen to each other."

So if you'll indulge Mortensen's teachings, listen to me... go see Green Book.
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10/10
Spot on. Magnificent.....
debsw3528 October 2018
I was fortunate enough to see this at a Directors Guild Screening last night. Wow!! Characters, dialogue, sets, costumes, cars..... really transported me to an era I had not experienced. I was sad when the movie ended... the mark of a great film. The scene with the fried chicken in the car was priceless. I could watch it 1000 times.I sense oscar nods for Mahershala Ali, Viggo Mortensen, art department, costumes, writer(s) and director. Absolutely amazing..... Do not hesisitate to see this!!!
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10/10
Great film
bmorris-658205 December 2018
Watched this at a cineworld unlimited screening and was so glad they picked this film! I'm not sure it's something I'd have gone to see had I seen the trailer but honestly it's a film for everyone. The screen was full and was one of the huge screens and only 2 people walked out just to give you a general picture of how the film went down. Definitely will be recommending this to friends and family.
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9/10
Virtuoso Performances
kirklaird9484 December 2018
Just seen Green Book at a Secret Unlimited screening at my local Cineworld. Wow...what a beautifully shot and performed movie. The two leading actors, Viggo Mortenson and Mahershala Ali were brilliant. I had no idea what to expect. I was more than pleasantly surprised. Highly recommended viewing
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10/10
I give it 👍👍. The negative reviews are full of it
brianjohnson-2004329 November 2018
I honestly don't understand why so many critics don't like this film as much as the audience. Green Book has a great artistic story, a good script, great acting, it has some great humor, some great drama and poigniance. It's well directed. It has both characters learn from one another and need one another despite often not being able to stand one another. It doesn't show such developments in a preachy kind of way. It doesn't seem to present any silly inconceivable blunders. I felt it was well worth spending 2 hours watching in a theater, and I found it one of the best films I've seen this year. If not the very best.

The rest of my review is for the purpose of responding to stupid reviews of people who find a way to hate this movie because of what it isn't as opposed to what it is.

Does Green Book have everything perfectly documented about life as a black person in Ali's character, or life as a white person for Mortenseon's character? No. Does it perfectly encapsulate every person's time and experience traveling and living in the south or the north of America at that time and in those places? No. Does it property portray all friendships of white and black people? No. Does the film perfectly show how the police treat people in every instance in the north and in the south? No. Does it feature sad people living their sad lives and learning nothing to effectively encapsulate how terrible and hopelessly serious some issues can be? No. Does the movie strike me as having a groundbreaking quality that puts it as the first or definitively best at doing whatever new ambitious thing it's trying to do? No

From my standpoint, these kinds of shortcoming could be said about every single good movie. Even if a movie is groundbreaking, it isn't an excellent film because it was groundbreaking or record shattering. Green Book's purpose is to show the experience of two specific characters along with their friends and family as the main two characters get to know each other. The story as it is told is believable, entertaining, interesting and likeable. And that is exactly what it was trying to be and, in my opinion, that angel serves the film very well. I don't know how perfectly the film was at showing exactly what really happened. But If anyone expects to be able to take a film based on true events as the perfect infallible account, they are the with the issue as opposed to the film.

As for what the film didn't cover: If you want all the facts or potential ramifications or heartbreaks of other people in this time going about their lives, you're better off reading some books, looking up some facts, or watching some documentaries about the topics. Nothing can tell every avenue of every conceivable story with perfect detail and accuracy. And a 2 hour movie is far from the ideal way of even try such a task.

Movies like Green Book are meant to exist as entertaining peices of art. And that is exactly what I thought Green Book was, and what made it good. I highly recommend this film is that's the sort of thing you like.
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10/10
A must see with award-worthy performances
wgordon1315 November 2018
I absolutely loved this movie. Such a heart warming story about true friendships, overcoming prejudices, and battling racism in the 60s. The performances were beyond stellar. I laughed, cried, and even cringed several times at the racial slurs and horrible treatment of Doc. Watching their friendship develop gave me hope, which is something we need more of today. The story is a perfect reminder of how we can overcome things when we come together. I wish everyone would watch this film.
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9/10
WONDERFUL!
winterh326 November 2018
Warning: Spoilers
Such a great movie with fantastic actors Viggo Mortensen and Marhershala Ali who brought so much to this true story about two men from totally opposite sides of the cultural spectrum take a two month road trip together to the south where they both were out of their perspective culture zones. Although they didn't "walk in each other's shoes," they walked close enough and through enough for each to change their perspectives of the other and to learn something from one another; ultimately becoming life long friends. Although there were exaggerations in personality portrayal of both main characters as well as others, they were good for a laugh and emphasized, within the length of a movie, the transitions made in two months. We both loved this movie! It is a crowd pleaser, winning many people's choice awards at film festivals. It wins ours!
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9/10
No rising and falling action. Just captivative excellence all the way thorugh.
jackgdemoss12 January 2019
I haven't seen a film like Green Book in quite some time. A film that doesn't have long-winded exposition followed by a dramatic resolution, but that is still satisfying the entire way through. I liken it to Forrest Gump in the sense that the captivation does not come from a place of waiting to see what comes next, but rather, it comes from being in that moment with the characters. Viggo Mortensen's performance was astonishing as a firmly rooted New Yorker. It certainly helped that Director Peter Farrelly pulled me into the 60s about thirty seconds into the opening scene. Green Book is a character driven film in which the characters are complex enough to remove certain aspects of predictability that we expect from most films. This was one of the best I have seen from 2018 and I recommend anyone give it a try.
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8/10
Lots of laughs amid a heart warming story
Roy-faltesek10 November 2018
Watching the friendship build between an uneducated racist white Italian and a well educated master black musician was entertaining and heart warming. And all the more poignant knowing it is based on a true story. At one point there is a discussion between the two about the wisdom of peaceful versus violent reaction to racism, a timely lesson or reminder for us all to hear in a time when an entire political party is being hijacked with extremist views (the press are our enemy, the Honduran caravan is an invasion, and "there were good people on both sides").
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9/10
A wonderful Film Guarenteed to Build Empathy
emailtombuchanan10 November 2018
I just enjoyed a preview screening of "Green Book," a heartwarming family film scheduled to release over the Thanksgiving holiday. Green Book is based on a true story about a black concert pianist (played by Mahershala Ali) who tours the American Deep South in the early 1960's, and takes along a rough-and-tumble Italian bar bouncer as his driver/fixer (played by Viggo Mortensen). The driver begins the tour as a northern racist who takes the eight week assignment because he needs quick cash, while the pianist starts the tour as a lonely and pompous prick unable to fully navigate the white world where his music is highly valued, and equally uncomfortable in black-America. Through the film we see the two characters find each other and themselves as they subtly bond, and we feel the connection as a real friendship blossoms. The title of the film comes from a once essential tour book that listed hotels and other businesses willing to serve black customers, in an era when American blacks were legally equal to whites but discrimination remained grossly overt. I was fortunate to see Green Book at Dartmouth College in a packed 237 seat theater with an audience that responded well to the drama and humor, and to the empathy developing on-screen. Green Book is a well-crafted PG-13 film that pulled excellent reviews in festival showings, and tells an important story in a touching way. The film shines a light on an ugly part of American history, and offers hope that by connecting with diverse characters and lives we can overcome our divisions. It's a wonderful story that perfectly fits our present times, and it needs to be shared.
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