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The 2-for-2 Oscar club could welcome Mahershala Ali, Rachel Weisz

The 2-for-2 Oscar club could welcome Mahershala Ali, Rachel Weisz
Mary Poppins is practically perfect in every way, but Mahershala Ali and Rachel Weisz could be actually perfect at the Oscars. The Oscar winners are on the verge of their second nominations, for “Green Book” and “The Favourite,” respectively, and could become the seventh and eighth actors to have a 2-for-2 record.

Only six actors have never lost an Oscar from multiple nominations:

1. Luise Rainer: Best Actress for “The Great Ziegfeld” (1936) and “The Good Earth” (1937)

2. Vivien Leigh: Best Actress for “Gone with the Wind” (1939) and “A Streetcar Named Desire” (1951)

3. Helen Hayes: Best Actress for “The Sin of Madelon Claudet” (1932) and Best Supporting Actress for “Airport” (1970)

4. Kevin Spacey: Best Supporting Actor for “The Usual Suspects” (1995) and Best Actor for “American Beauty” (1999)

5. Hilary Swank: Best Actress for “Boys Don’t Cry” (1999) and “Million Dollar Baby” (2004)

6. Christoph Waltz: Best Supporting Actor for “Inglourious Basterds” (2009) and “Django Unchained” (2012)

Two
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Mahershala Ali could become the 7th performer with a perfect 2-for-2 Oscar record

Mahershala Ali could become the 7th performer with a perfect 2-for-2 Oscar record
What’s harder than winning more than Oscar? Having a perfect record while doing so. But that’s what our combined odds are forecasting for Mahershala Ali (“Green Book”), who could join the exclusive 2-for-2 club if he prevails in Best Supporting Actor.

Only six actors have never lost an Oscar from multiple nominations:

1. Luise Rainer: Best Actress for “The Great Ziegfeld” (1936) and “The Good Earth” (1937)

2. Vivien Leigh: Best Actress for “Gone with the Wind” (1939) and “A Streetcar Named Desire” (1951)

3. Helen Hayes: Best Actress for “The Sin of Madelon Claudet” (1932) and Best Supporting Actress for “Airport” (1970)

4. Kevin Spacey: Best Supporting Actor for “The Usual Suspects” (1995) and Best Actor for “American Beauty” (1999)

5. Hilary Swank: Best Actress for “Boys Don’t Cry” (1999) and “Million Dollar Baby” (2004)

6. Christoph Waltz: Best Supporting Actor for “Inglourious Basterds” (2009) and “Django Unchained” (2012)

See Mahershala Ali knocks Timothee Chalamet out of top spot
See full article at Gold Derby »

‘A Star Is Born’ and Lady Gaga could end 14-year Oscar drought of Best Picture and Actress matching wins

‘A Star Is Born’ and Lady Gaga could end 14-year Oscar drought of Best Picture and Actress matching wins
Will the third time be the charm? For the past two years, we were thisclose to having the Best Picture and Best Actress Oscars go to the same film for the first time since “Million Dollar Baby” (2004). Emma Stone took home Best Actress for “La La Land” (2016) and we all know what happened after that. Frances McDormand cruised to her second Best Actress statuette for “Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri” (2017), but her divisive film, which was predicted to win (oops), fell to “The Shape of Water.” And now “A Star Is Born” and Lady Gaga are the odds-on favorites to prevail, which would only be the 12th time ever that Best Picture and Best Actress lined up.

It might be hard to believe, but Picture-Actress matchups were more common in the early days of the Oscars than Picture-Actor; there were four Picture-Actress overlaps to one for Actor before the latter started dominating.
See full article at Gold Derby »

Frances McDormand (‘Three Billboards’) would be fifth double Best Actress Oscar champ with a 2-0 record

Frances McDormand (‘Three Billboards’) would be fifth double Best Actress Oscar champ with a 2-0 record
Not only will Frances McDormand become the 14th person with multiple Best Actress Oscars if she wins for “Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri” Sunday, but she’ll join an even more exclusive group that not even Meryl Streep or Katharine Hepburn are part of: Best Actress winners with a perfect record after multiple nominations.

The 1996 champ for “Fargo,” McDormand would be the fifth person with a 2-0 record in Best Actress following Luise Rainer (1936’s “The Great Ziegfeld,” 1937’s “The Good Earth”), Vivien Leigh (1939’s “Gone with the Wind,” 1951’s “A Streetcar Named Desire”), Sally Field (1979’s “Norma Rae,” 1984’s “Places of the Heart”) and Hilary Swank (1999’s “Boys Don’t Cry,” 2004’s “Million Dollar Baby”).

See Hardly a Sophie’s choice: Meryl Streep is your favorite multiple Best Actress Oscar winner

However, like Field, McDormand’s overall Oscar record isn’t pristine: She’s lost three supporting bids for
See full article at Gold Derby »

Oscar history: Best Picture winners chosen by preferential ballot (1934-1945) include classic films

Oscar history: Best Picture winners chosen by preferential ballot (1934-1945) include classic films
In 2009 — when the Academy Awards went to 10 Best Picture nominees for the first time since 1943 — the preferential system of voting, which had been used from 1934 to 1945, was reintroduced. The academy did so as it believed this “best allows the collective judgment of all voting members to be most accurately represented.”

We have detailed how the preferential voting system works at the Oscars in the modern era. So, let’s take a look back at those dozen years early in the history of the academy when it first used this complicated counting to determine the Best Picture winner rather than a simple popular vote. (At the bottom of this post, be sure to vote for the film that you think will take the top Oscar this year.)

See Best Picture Gallery: Every winner of the top Academy Award

1934

This seventh ceremony marked the first time that the Oscars eligibility period was the calendar year.
See full article at Gold Derby »

Hardly a Sophie’s choice: Meryl Streep is your favorite multiple Best Actress Oscar winner [Poll Results]

Hardly a Sophie’s choice: Meryl Streep is your favorite multiple Best Actress Oscar winner [Poll Results]
Meryl Streep’s twin wins are twice as nice for you. With 36 percent of the vote, Streep beat out her 13 fellow multiple Best Actress Oscar winners in our poll asking for your favorite.

“Meryl Streep is the most versatile, amazing actress of my lifetime,” user John K. commented.

Streep is the most recent multiple Best Actress champ, winning for “The Iron Lady” (2011) 29 years after her first triumph for “Sophie’s Choice” (1982). But she’ll lose that title this weekend if Frances McDormand (“Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri”) wins as expected.

See 2018 Oscars: Frances McDormand (‘Three Billboards’) would set third longest gap between Best Actress wins

Way back in second place was Vivien Leigh, who earned 15 percent of the vote. “Vivien Leigh is the only one where both victories was my top choice in the years they won,” user Jay DeFelice wrote of her “Gone with the Wind” (1939) and “A Streetcar Named Desire” (1951) wins.
See full article at Gold Derby »

Who is your favorite multiple Best Actress Oscar winner? [Poll]

Who is your favorite multiple Best Actress Oscar winner? [Poll]
Frances McDormand (“Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri”) is a few weeks away from becoming one of 14 women who’ve won more than one Best Actress Oscar. McDormand, who took home the prize for “Fargo” (1996), would join 12 other women as two-time winners, two shy of Katharine Hepburn’s all-time record of four. Before McDormand joins this elite club, which of the first lucky 13 champs is your favorite?

Luise Rainer was the first actress to win two and the first performer to win back-to-back Oscars, triumphing for “The Great Ziegfeld” (1936) and “The Good Earth” (1937). Bette Davis (1935’s “Dangerous” and 1938’s “Jezebel”) joined her the following year. Eleven years later, Davis’ pal Olivia de Havilland won her second Oscar for 1949’s “The Heiress,” three years after her “To Each His Own” victory.

Two years after that, Vivien Leigh, who first took home the award for “Gone with the Wind” (1939), won for “A Streetcar Named Desire
See full article at Gold Derby »

Oscars 2018: Best Picture & Best Actress have gone hand-in-hand only 7 times in 75 years – will they match again?

  • Gold Derby
Oscars 2018: Best Picture & Best Actress have gone hand-in-hand only 7 times in 75 years – will they match again?
This year’s Oscars are unique in how much more female-driven the Best Picture nominees are. Five out of the nine contenders in the top category have female leads, and four of the Best Actress nominees are in films that are also up for the top award: Sally Hawkins (“The Shape of Water“), Frances McDormand (“Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri”), Saoirse Ronan (“Lady Bird”) and Meryl Streep (“The Post”). If one of those films wins both Best Picture and Best Actress, it would be only the 8th to pair those up in the last 75 years.

In the last three-quarters of a century the seven Best Picture/Best Actress match-ups were as follows:

1975 — “One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest” and lead actress Louise Fletcher

1977 — “Annie Hall” and lead actress Diane Keaton

1983 — “Terms of Endearment” and lead actress Shirley MacLaine

1989 — “Driving Miss Daisy” and lead actress Jessica Tandy

1991 — “The Silence of the Lambs
See full article at Gold Derby »

Oscars 2018: Frances McDormand (‘Three Billboards’) would be 14th two-time Best Actress winner

Oscars 2018: Frances McDormand (‘Three Billboards’) would be 14th two-time Best Actress winner
No acting category at the Oscars has had more repeat winners than Best Actress, with 13 performers claiming two or more statues. Now Frances McDormand is in a strong position to add her name to that list for her performance in “Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri.” As of this writing McDormand leads our predictions with odds of 2/13 based on the combined forecasts of more than 3,400 users who have entered their picks at Gold Derby. If our predictions prove true, McDormand would join the following repeat champs:

Ingrid Bergman: “Gaslight” (1944) and “Anastasia” (1956)

Bette Davis: “Dangerous” (1935) and “Jezebel” (1938)

Olivia de Havilland: “To Each His Own” (1946) and “The Heiress” (1949)

Sally Field: “Norma Rae” (1979) and “Places in the Heart” (1984)

Jane Fonda: “Klute” (1971) and “Coming Home” (1978)

Jodie Foster: “The Accused” (1988) and “The Silence of the Lambs” (1991)

Katharine Hepburn: “Morning Glory” (1933), “Guess Who’s Coming to Dinner” (1967), “The Lion in Winter
See full article at Gold Derby »

Oscars 2018: Will Best Picture and Best Director line up for the first time since ‘Birdman’?

Oscars 2018: Will Best Picture and Best Director line up for the first time since ‘Birdman’?
It used to be pretty much an Academy Awards norm that the film that won Best Picture also took home the Oscar for Best Director. In recent years that has changed, largely due to the preferential ballot that has been implemented for Best Picture voting. These two categories have split in four of the past five years, with “Birdman” (2014) and its director Alejandro G. Inarritu being the last time they lined up. Currently “The Shape of Water” is in first place to win both categories on Gold Derby’s Oscar charts, so might things get back on track this year?

See 2018 Oscar nominations: Full list of Academy Awards nominees in all 24 categories

A year ago Damien Chazelle won Best Director for “La La Land” while “Moonlight” took Best Picture, becoming the fourth time this decade that the Oscar split occurred. In 2015 Inarritu won Best Director for “The Revenent” (his second
See full article at Gold Derby »

The politically incorrect Oscars: 9 white actors who were recognized for playing minorities

After two straight years of all-white acting nominees in 2015 and 2016, the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences responded to the #OscarsSoWhite issue by inviting a far more diverse and younger field of talent both behind and in front of the camera to join. And though there are miles to go until there is true diversity, the academy’s nominees and winners are beginning to reflect our culture.

Last year, “Moonlight” became the first Best Picture winner with an all-black cast. Its director Barry Jenkins shared the Best Adapted Screenplay Oscar with Tarell Alvin McCraney, while Mahershala Ali won Best Supporting Actor. Viola Davis also took home Best Supporting Actress for “Fences.”

This year’s black nominees include Jordan Peele, a triple nominee for producing, directing and writing Best Picture contender “Get Out,” which also scored a Best Actor nomination for Daniel Kaluuya. Two-time winner Denzel Washington is nominated for “Roman J.
See full article at Gold Derby »

2018 Oscars: Will ‘Three Billboards’ be the first Best Picture champ without a director or screenplay win in 15 years?

2018 Oscars: Will ‘Three Billboards’ be the first Best Picture champ without a director or screenplay win in 15 years?
Martin McDonagh’s omission from the Best Director final five was a big blow to “Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri” as it now tries to become just the fifth film to win the Best Picture Oscar without a directing nomination. But that may not be the only stat it has to defy: “Three Billboards” could also be the first film in 15 years to snag the main award without a directing or screenplay win.

Only 10 other films have done this. They are:

1. “Wings” (1927/28)

2. “The Broadway Melody” (1928/29)

3. “Grand Hotel” (1931/32)

4. “Mutiny on the Bounty” (1935)

5. “The Great Ziegfeld” (1936)

6. “Rebecca” (1940)

7. “Hamlet” (1948)

8. “All the King’s Men” (1949)

9. “Gladiator” (2000)

10. “Chicago” (2002)

(1952 Best Picture champ “The Greatest Show on Earth” could also be included in this list — it won the now-defunct Oscar for Best Story, which didn’t award the actual script and co-existed with Best Original Screenplay until it was dissolved after the 1956 season.)

Directing and screenplay understandably
See full article at Gold Derby »

2018 Oscars: Frances McDormand (‘Three Billboards’) would set third longest gap between Best Actress wins

2018 Oscars: Frances McDormand (‘Three Billboards’) would set third longest gap between Best Actress wins
After victories at the Golden Globes, Critics’ Choice and Screen Actors Guild Awards, Frances McDormand (“Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri”) is the odds-on favorite to join a select group of women: performers who’ve won at least two Best Actress Oscars. McDormand would be the 14th to do so and perhaps most impressively, her double would be the third longest timespan between first and second wins.

McDormand won her first Oscar for “Fargo” a whoppin’ 21 years ago — that’s a whole person who can drink! She’d be behind only Meryl Streep (“Sophie’s Choice,” “The Iron Lady”), who waited 29 years, and Katharine Hepburn (“Morning Glory,” “Guess Who’s Coming to Dinner”), who holds the record at 34 years.

Most two-time Best Actress winners garner their second statuette within a decade of their first, usually within the first five years in that “honeymoon period” when, to paraphrase one double champ, they like you,
See full article at Gold Derby »

114 days until Oscar

This season's Oscar ceremony, the Academy's 90th annual shindig, is on March 4th, 2018. Did you know that only two Oscar ceremonies have ever happened on a March 4th? Late February, Late March, and early April have been the most frequent time frames over the decades.

the acting winners of '42: Van Heflin, Greer Garson, James Cagney, and Teresa Wright

Both of the March 4th ceremonies were very early in Oscar history:The 1936 Oscars honoring The Great Ziegfeld (March 4th, 1937 at the Biltmore Hotel) and the 1942 Oscars honoring Mrs Miniver (March 4th, 1943 at the Cocoanut Grove in the Ambassador Hotel). I was delighted to realize that we've written about a few of the winners from those years in the past: the dance direction in The Great Ziegfeld,  My Gal Sal's Art Direction, Mrs Miniver as Best Picture, The Great Ziegfeld as Best Picture, and Black Swan's Cinematography. 
See full article at FilmExperience »

120 days til Oscar. "Best Dance Direction," anyone?

by Nathaniel R

It's your useless morning trivia! Guess what the 120th Oscar handed out was? If my calculations are correct -- I carefully counted through "Inside Oscar"'s brilliant year-by-year history to determine the order -- it was Best Dance Direction 1936 which went to Seymour Felix for "A Pretty Girl is Like a Melody" from The Great Ziegfeld. The famous number led up to the film's intermission. The film also won Best Picture. 

"Best Dance Direction" only lasted three years at the Oscars from 1935 through 1937.

Rather hilariously, the genius Busby Berkeley never won it though he was nominated all three years running and is the only man among the 11 nominated for that award that has any name recognition in the 21st century. Remember when Ryan Gosling was going to star as him in a biopic ? Too bad that never materialized! 

Here's Felix's winning number:
See full article at FilmExperience »

If today's your birthday, you're golden!

The 90th Academy Awards celebrating the 2017 film year will be held on March 4th, 2018, just 344 days from now. Only two previous ceremonies have been held on March 4th with those Oscars going to The Great Ziegfeld (1936) and Mrs Miniver (1942). Hmmm. Does this mean we'll get a showbiz biopic set during Ww II as Best Picture next season?

Useless Oscar Trivia of the Day!

March 25th, today, shares with March 29th (coming right up) the distinction of being the date on which the most Oscar nights have been held. Both dates have seen five Oscar nights so if you were born on either of those dates please know that your birthday is also a special anniversary for many movies, creatives, and actors and for some of you The Actual special day. Consider...

March 25th Ceremonies
See full article at FilmExperience »

11 Actresses Who Earned Oscar Nods for Musicals

11 Actresses Who Earned Oscar Nods for Musicals
La La Land garnered a record-tying 14 Academy Award nominations this year — it’s now neck-and-neck with Titanic and All About Eve for receiving the most Oscar nominations in a given year. Among those nods is a first-ever Best Actress nom for Emma Stone, who’s been racking up rave reviews for her performance in the film.

While we’ve got musicals on the mind, let’s take a look back at some other actresses who’ve received acclaim for their musical turns.

Anne Hathaway, Les Misérables (2012)

Hathaway’s turn as Fantine was the only non-technical award the 2012 adaptation of the smash musical picked up.
See full article at PEOPLE.com »

Oscars 2017: How Will ‘La La Land’ Perform in Relation to Previous Best Picture-Winning Musicals?

La La Land’ (Courtesy: Lionsgate)

By: Carson Blackwelder

Managing Editor

La La Land has officially earned a spot in the history books by tying the record for the most Oscar nominations ever — but just how many of those 14 chances will it see a win? This critical darling is widely considered to take home best picture come February 26, which would make it just the 11th musical to do so, so let’s examine how it stands in the other categories by doing a deep dive into the track records of the 10 musicals that took home top honors before it.

These legendary musicals that were all able to garner Hollywood’s top award include: 1929’s The Broadway Melody, 1936’s The Great Ziegfeld, 1944’s Going My Way, 1951’s An American in Paris, 1958’s Gigi, 1961’s West Side Story, 1964’s My Fair Lady, 1965’s The Sound of Music, 1968’s Oliver!, and 2002’s Chicago. Now,
See full article at Scott Feinberg »

Oscars: How Often Do Musicals Result in Best Actor and Best Actress Nominations and Wins?

Emma Stone and Ryan Gosling in ‘La La Land’ (Courtesy: Lionsgate)

By: Carson Blackwelder

Managing Editor

Not only is La La Land breaking records as the most-nominated musical in Oscar history but that haul of 14 nominations for its lead pair, Emma Stone and Ryan Gosling. Musicals don’t often get that much love from the Academy Awards and getting recognition in both the best actor and best actress categories is even rarer. Let’s take a look back at the history of this happening and see how Stone and Gosling’s nominations — and potential wins — are important.

Taking a look at this year’s nominations, Stone is favored to win more than Gosling is for their work in the Damien Chazelle-directed musical. Gosling is up against Casey Affleck (Manchester by the Sea), Andrew Garfield (Hacksaw Ridge), Viggo Mortensen (Captain Fantastic), and Denzel Washington (Fences) — with the latter expected to reign supreme.
See full article at Scott Feinberg »

Oscars: How Often Is There a Split Between Best Picture and Best Director?

La La Land’ and ‘Moonlight’ (Courtesy: Dale Robinette; David Bornfriend/A24)

By: Carson Blackwelder

Managing Editor

Nothing is certain at the Oscars, and that absolutely applies to the best picture and best director categories. While it is common for films to win both of these trophies in a given year, sometimes they can go to two different works. There’s a chance that La La Land and Moonlight could split these categories at the upcoming ceremony — but how often does that happen?

Both of these films are considered frontrunners in both the best picture and best director category at the upcoming Oscars. This site’s namesake, The Hollywood Reporter’s Scott Feinberg, lists La La Land — written and directed by Damien Chazelle — and Moonlight — written and directed by Barry Jenkins — as the top two contenders in both categories in his latest check-in on the race. The two films have been
See full article at Scott Feinberg »
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